Hugh Gaitskell and Harold Wilson: fifty years on

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Sudden deaths in frontline British politics are mercifully quite rare. In 1970, Iain Macleod died suddenly a month after becoming Chancellor of the Exchequer, a desperate blow to Edward Heath’s new Tory Government. In 1994, Opposition leader John Smith died suddenly of a heart attack. Had he lived, it seems virtually certain he would have led Labour back into power in 1997 instead of Tony Blair.

Although he had been leading Labour for seven years at the time of his death fifty years ago (he led the Opposition for longer than any other post-war leader except Neil Kinnock) it is less certain Hugh Gaitskell would ever have enjoyed the trappings of Downing Street even had he lived. True, Labour did win power again in October 1964. But this was only after Gaitskell’s successor Harold Wilson had immeasurably boosted the party. And even then it was a narrow win. Gaitskell had lost the 1959 election heavily and might well have led the party to defeat again. However, we will never know.

The youthful combative Harold Wilson was undoubtedly the right choice for the party at the time even though his leadership after the Labour landslide of 1966 would prove disappointing. George Brown, who came second in the race, was to prove a notoriously erratic figure and later that year appeared drunk on TV (having just provoked a fight with US actor Eli Wallach) on a  programme on which he was being interviewed about President Kennedy’s assassination which had occurred earlier that day. James Callaghan, who came third in the 1963 leadership, would eventually lead Labour and the UK himself between 1976 and 1979.

Alas Hugh Gaitskell famous for his two conference speeches in which he tearfully pledged to “fight and fight again to save the party we love” and another in which he declared  that European integration threatened to end “a thousand years f British history” would never get this opportunity to lead his country.  After years spent fighting the left and working to keep the party alive, he died just as things were finally falling into place.

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